Helping the homeless populace in Nepal

The landlocked Nepal is one of the deprived and least developed countries in the world. Most of the populace of Nepal depends on agriculture for their livelihood however only 20 percent of the total land area of Nepal can be used for cultivation. Most of the Nepalese lives in rural areas and cultivate crops such as rice and wheat. Due to lack of employment and high poverty one out of every ten Nepalese are forced to migrate to Kathmandu and other places. Furthermore large numbers of people ran to cities in search of safety of their lives during the long rebel insurgency in the past. Due to the migration from the rural to the urban areas there is lack of adequate housing facilities in cities and this has resulted in crowded living spaces.

 

The landlocked Nepal is one of the deprived and least developed countries in the world.

Overcrowding of the houses has resulted in growth of substandard housing. This has resulted in construction of houses with thatched roofs and straw walls occasionally supported by bamboo pillars or old timber. There is also lack of adequate safe drinking water with no electricity. Due to its weak construction with bamboo and timber thousands of families lose their homes to fire. These weak houses are also vulnerable to natural disasters like landslides, floods and the like.

 

Along with the problem of homelessness there also exist the grave concerns for the slum dwellers. Nepal’s slum population is escalating with each day and along with it the problem of unemployment; overcrowding and increasing natural disasters are also impacting the deprived and the poorest of all.

Advertisements

One thought on “Helping the homeless populace in Nepal

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s